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Definitions

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The following is an Old Tools/Galoot Dictionary. It's arranged alphabetically (first letter of first word in case of a phrase).

A

B

Borg (also The Borg)
Porch term for box/warehouse home improvement stores. Often refers to the orange menace but can also apply to the navy-blue menace and all their look-alikes. Evolved from a comparison between home improvement stores and the alien race, Borg, on Star Trek that assimilates all others by implanting brainwashing computer chips into the mind[1].

C

Cabinet Pitch
A steeper bedding angle of 55 degrees, used in cabinetmakers' molding planes. [2] See also, Common Pitch and York Pitch.
Chisely
adjective: Of or relating to chisels. Usage: That whatsit is chisely. My friend with a taste for all things chisely...

(first usage on the Porch in 1999 by Steve Pugh, credit to Tony Seo for using it in this thread)

Common Pitch
Pitch refers to the bedding angle of the iron or cutter in a bench plane. "Common Pitch" is an angle of 45 degrees.[3] .[4]

D

Dovetail Bishoping
This is usually referred to as an undesirable practice and considered to be a "fault". It consists of using the peen of a Warrington pattern hammer to "mushroom" the end grain fibers of a tail which wound up being a little loose. Of course, this would work best if the ends of the tails were slightly proud of the pin section so that one could subsequently plane off the evidence of one's misdeeds.[5]

E

Electrolysis
A technique for returning surface rust to iron. It uses the effect of a small low voltage electric current and a suitable electrolyte solution. The electrolytic method removes nothing. By returning surface rust to metallic iron, rust scale is loosened and can be easily removed. Un-rusted metal is not affected in any way. The solutions used are not hazardous; the voltages and currents are low, so there is no electrical hazard. No noxious fumes are produced. The method is self limiting. It is impossible to overclean an object. [6]

F

Fettling
Originally (?) from making a sand casting ready for machining. Now applied generally to endeavours involved in putting things in to working order.

G

Galoot
1: A Old Tools list participant, past or present. [7]
2: A foolish or uncouth individual, often applied to an old man. Sometimes a phrase applied to 'green' recruits not yet skillful. This is expanded upon in this message to the Porch.

H

I

J

K

L

Listmom
An esteemed position on the porch, a listmom is an enforcer of all things galoot on the Oldtools list.

M

Middle Pitch
Refers to the bedding angle of the iron or cutter in a bench plane. The angle being 55 degrees. This pitch is normally used with highly figured woods causing less tearout. [8]

N

Neanderthal
An originally deprecative label applied to hand tool users on the 'rec.woodworking' forum. Later adopted by the intended insultees as an honorific. (See: galoot)

O

P

Pitch
1:Refers to angle of the iron (blade) in a plane. Measured from the back/bottom of the iron to the sole of the plane. See Common Pitch or York Pitch for examples.
2:Refers to the P.P.I. or T.P.I. of saw teeth.
3:The Rake of a saw tooth (rare)
Porch
The virtual gathering place for the Galooterati.
P.P.I.
Abbreviation for Points Per Inch; the number of teeth, measured point to point, per inch on a saw. Usually written "PPI". This is the common measurement of teeth in the U.S. See also T.P.I. and Pitch.

Q

R

Rake
The angle of the front face of a saw tooth to the toothline. Rake can be described as positive (greater than 90°) or negative (less than 90°). (Small graphic needed) (is the angle measured from toe or tote of the saw?)
Rust hunt
The interminable search for old tools engaged in by galoots. When successful, the hunt culminates in an iron feeding frenzy. May be observed at rust haunts - in person at garage and estate sales, flea markets and 'anteek mauls', and virtually on the 'Bay.

S

Slippery slope
In "old tool" parlance generally refers to standing on, or having recently stuck one's big toe over the edge of the precipice of accumulating old tools.
While some television programmes refer to "hoarders" that descriptor is not generally acknowledged to apply to old tool aficionados (a.k.a. Galoots) as some people view it as too simplistic a descriptor, and is generally applied by others to that which they do not comprehend.
Most old tool collectors have been well advised about the "slippery slope"
If you are reading this, please be advised yer really close to, if not slightly over, the edge of the slippery slope!

T

T.P.I.
Abbreviation for Teeth Per Inch; the number of teeth measured gullet to gullet per inch on a saw. Usually written "TPI". This was the common measurement of teeth in the U.K. See also P.P.I. and Pitch.

U

V

W

Whatsit
The term "whatsit" is used to denote a tool whose original purpose is not known to the current owner. Generally posted as a query to the group for the gathering of communal knowledge and wisdom.

X

Y

York Pitch
Refers to the bedding angle of the iron or cutter in a bench plane. The angle being 50 degrees. This pitch is normally used with highly figured woods causing less tearout.[9] [10]

Z

References

  1. Citation Needed
  2. http://www.thebestthings.com/cab_vs_j.htm
  3. http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=48#message OldTools Message #48, Doug Dawson, 1996-02-02
  4. Charles Holtzapffel, Turning and Mechanical Manipulation, Vol 2, page 482
  5. http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=4#message OldTools Message #4, Don McConnell, 1996-02-01
  6. http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=99#message OldTools Message #99, Ted Kinsey, 1996-02-05
  7. http://swingleydev.com/archive/faq.html#Galoot
  8. Charles Holtzapffel, Turning and Mechanical Manipulation, Vol 2, page 482
  9. http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=48#message OldTools Message #48, Doug Dawson, 1996-02-02
  10. Charles Holtzapffel, Turning and Mechanical Manipulation, Vol 2, page 482